Categories
Illustrations

The song writer vocalizing and scribbling down lyrics

Learning Goal: I’m working on a illustrations project and need support to help me learn.
Overview
For this assignment you will be using Adobe Audition to produce a sound story.
The main “character” of this story will be a song (or a section of recorded music).
Throughout the duration of this story, the listener will travel to different spaces and discover the song emanating from different sound sources.
I will refer to these different sound sources and spaces as “scenes” throughout this assignment.
This story structure will require the composer (that’s you!) to do several things:
Convey the sense of traveling from one space to another.Establish a sense of place
Produce a sense of transitioning from one space to another
Modify the sonic character of the song so that it matches the intended sonic source.Sources could include:A small, antique radio
A car stereo
The neighbor’s hi-fi stereo
A person humming/whistling the melody
The song writer vocalizing and scribbling down lyrics
A stadium concert sound system
A MIDI reproduction of the song
Establish the sense of a physical space.Spaces could include:A crowded bus
An empty church
A metal tunnel
Underwater
Outside/inside the club
Physical space should includeAmbient sounds/noises
Acoustic properties (especially Reverberation)
Location of the sound source in relation to the listenerLeft, right, up, down
Moving or static location
Occlusions (does something temporarily block the direct sound?)
Your sound story should be continuous, with seamless transitions from one space and sound source to another, but you are not required to account for all the transitions that would be required in the physical world to go from location to location (eg. traveling on a city bus to jumping in lake). Transitions between spaces can be dramatic, but try to make the transition itself evident (eg. bus door swings open, person takes a deep breath, two quick steps, quiet space with a bird chirping and wind through trees, splash!).
Your story should have at least 4 distinct spaces with unique and dramatically different sound sources.
The length of your sound story should be approximately 1 – 2 minutes. Longer is not necessarily better.
Workload Estimate
You are expected to spend at least 8 hours on this project. This estimate includes time to conceptualize your story, write a sound-script, collect and record sound samples, study additional editing techniques/effects, produce your sound story, actively reflect on and critique your work, make additional iterations on your project, mixdown your project into an MP3, mixdown an archival uncompressed audio version of your project, and upload your MP3 and sound-script.
Learning Objectives
Demonstrate proficiency with basic sound recording, following best practices for clear, high quality results.
Demonstrate a basic technical and conceptual proficiency with Adobe Audition.Build multitrack audio with a variety of audio assets.
Perform basic audio editing to optimize levels and clarity of recorded sounds.
Apply audio effects and processing to sounds to achieve specific practical and expressive effects.
Process musical sound to evoke the sense of the music physically inhabiting the world and originating from a specific sound source.
Apply observations of audio experiences from the physical world to the production of a digitally constructed sound story.
Instructions
Conceptualization/Foundations
Before you actively start production activities on this projectSpend time listening to the world you inhabitWhen it is safe to do so, close your eyes while doing this activity.
What do you hear?
Where is the sound coming from?
How far away is the sound source?
How does your perception of the sound change as you move closer or further from the sound source?
What can you tell about the space you are inhabiting from the qualities of the sound?
What else do you hear when you listen for the less prominent sounds?
Listen to how sounds change when you are moving in relation to them (or they are moving in relation to you).
Play the same song on different sound reproduction equipment. Change to location of the equipment
Change your location in relation to the equipment
Put a pillow or blanket over a speaker
Take notes as you do these observations (a voice recorder would work great for this!)
Pick a song or piece of music Not every song or piece of music will be equally well suited to this project.
Look for music that is relatively consistent in its sonic character for an extended duration.A Daft Punk song that features a periodic application of a low pass filter (all the high frequency sound is eliminated) limits your ability to use a low pass filter as an effect to produce a specific sense of the sound source and space.
Acoustic instruments and natural vocals work very well.We are very sensitive to the qualities of natural human voices. This makes them perfect for producing a perception of specific sound sources and spaces through our own application of effects and sonic modulations.
Traditional, relatively unprocessed instruments (especially acoustic ones) will also work very well.
Highly processed instruments and voices don’t give us the clear acoustic reference point.Especially avoid Auto-tuned voices
Phaser/flanger/chorus effects
Highly spectrally processed (EQ) songs
If these terms/qualities are unfamiliar, look them up and/or start a discussion topic!
Production
Produce a detailed written sound script. (You will submit this as part of your assignment deliverables.) This is a sequential description of what the listener will hear.
The more detailed this script is, the easier it will be to produce a strong, effective story.
Don’t forget to include descriptions of sonic qualities (panning, amplitude, effects).
Sonic environments should be layered with ambient sounds as well as “featured” sounds.
Remember, you can’t rely on visual information, so a script that says, “A man steps into the dark entrance to the tunnel.” is of no use. You might instead say, “We hear the sound of footsteps. A man’s hard soled shoes splash in sticky mud then impact the metal surface of a tunnel. (The reverberation transitions from dry to a very wet effect, using the “Endless Tunnel” Impulse of the convolution reverb).
Collect and record sound samples.For this project you are allowed to use sound samples from sound libraries/collections.
It can sometimes be easier to record your own sounds if you have something specific in mind rather than wading through endless options. Study “Foley” artists!
Remember that sound designers produce sounds that support the story/mood/atmosphere. Often sounds are dramatically enhanced from what they would be in the physical world to achieve the desired storytelling results.
Construct a rough sequence of sound clips in the timeline of your multitrack session. Your song should not be continuously playing throughout the timeline.
You don’t necessarily want your song to play through in real time. (Repeating the same recognizable section in your progression of “scenes” may be more effective in some cases.)
I recommend building up each sound source-space scene in dedicated tracks so you have the option of applying effects to entire tracks without affecting the character of other scenes.If you want to copy one or more effects that you have fine tuned you can do this as shown in this video:
Apply effects and modulations to your song clips to establish a specific sound source.Spectral (EQ) processing is very important for many sound sources.
Add ambient sounds, apply effects, modulations and envelopes to establish a specific sonic space.
Build transitions between your scenes.
Adjust the levels for your project to ensure that you have a good strong sound without unintentionally loud and quiet sections.
Mixdown an MP3 and an uncompressed (AIFF or WAVE) version of your project.
Archive your Audition session files.
Deliverables
UploadYour MP3 audio file (listen to it to make sure it is complete)
Your Sound Script document
Archive (don’t upload)Uncompressed audio mixdown
Audition session files

Categories
Illustrations

Scaffold each of your fashion pose references with the method in 4.2.

Learning Goal: I’m working on a illustrations multi-part question and need a sample publish to help me learn.
Materials
Drawing pad (at least 11×14″)
Clear grid ruler
Drawing tools (pens, pencils, markers, etc.)
6 reference images of full-body opposite-angle/contrapposto fashion poses. Mixed gender (at least one male if you choose to draw mostly females, for example).
Choose from fashion editorial, catalog, or runway sources. Your references can be from magazines, shop catalogs, printouts, or digital. I have created a frequently-updated Pinterest board full of great fashion pose references for your convenience.
Part 1: Mapping your references
Scaffold each of your fashion pose references with the method in 4.2. This can be done physically, directly on your print-out or magazine cover, on tracing paper, or digitally (using an app, like Instagram). Make sure you highlight at least the following:
The balance line
The shoulder line
The hip line
The waist line
The CF,CB line, or Side Seam
The joints
Part 2: Drawing fashion poses
Draw 6 fully formed croquis figures based on your references. Bodies can be of any gender but they should also be a variety of genders (don’t just draw all masculine or feminine croquis).
Draw and label as many 9-head croquis scaffolds as you need.
Figures must be in the 9-head scale.
They must all have different opposite angle poses (no standard upright croquis in which the shoulder and hip lines are parallel).
Your figures must adhere to the guidelines of opposite-angle posing– be wary of the balance line, the hip and shoulder lines, joint sizes, and limb length as you rotate and angle the body.
Draw the Center Front/Back and other contour lines (panty line, bust contouring, etc.).
Draw the hands and feet. Make sure they are the right size for the figure. Scaffold the hands and feet as you did in Module 3.
Draw the head and its scaffold (center line and eye line).
Draw the body fully fleshed out around your “skeleton.”

Categories
Illustrations

Practice “foley” approaches to producing sounds.

Learning Goal: I’m working on a illustrations project and need support to help me learn.
Overview
For this assignment you will listen carefully to the world around you and record sounds.
Workload Estimate
You are expected to spend at least 4 hours on this project. This estimate includes time to: study reference materials, practice deep listening, record existing sounds, record sounds that you actively generate,
Learning Objectives
Demonstrate proficiency with basic sound recording, following best practices for clear, high quality results.
Practice “deep listening”.
Practice “foley” approaches to producing sounds.
Instructions
Getting Started
Deep Listening (spend time listening, not just hearing)Pauline Oliveros states, “To hear is the physical means that enables perception, to listen is to give attention to what is perceived both acoustically and psychologically”
The Center for Deep Listening: About Deep Listening (Links to an external site.)”Deep Listening is exploring the relationships among any and all sounds whether natural or technological, intended or unintended, real, remembered or imaginary. Thought is included.”
Dempster, Oliveros, P., & Panaiotis. (1989). Deep listening. New Albion Records. Streaming audio (access limited to those affiliated with ASU) Links to an external site.
Listening ActivityFind a location where you can close your eyes and spend at least 15 minutes continuously listening.Bring a notebook or use a voice recorder to take notes.
Set a timer for 15 minutes (or more).
Close your eyes.
Tune in to all the sounds you hear.
Note what you are hearing. If you can’t identify the source, make a description of the sound.
Listen for echos or reverberations that inform your perception of the space.
Note these acoustic phenomena.
See how many sounds you can perceive at once.
Note any psychological responses that result from your listening experience.
Make a 2-5 minute audio recording of the space you inhabited for this exercise.
Listen back to this recording. Compare your experience of listening to the physical space to that of listening to your recording of the space.
Save your notes as a text file.
Production
Record soundsFor most students, your phone will serve as your best mobile sound recording tool. If you have more specialized professional options, you can certainly use them, but most relatively contemporary phones have fairly good sound recording capabilities and are certainly adequate for this module.
To get the best quality out of your recording deviceGet as close to the sound source as is reasonable and and safe (this will give you more of the signal you want to record, with less background noise)
Use a wind screen (if there is any wind blowing over the microphone).A lightweight sock stretched over your microphone (phone) can make a big improvement
Isolate the sound source as much as possible.
Minimize reflections (unless this is a feature of the sound you are recording)If the sound source fits in your closet with you, record it there. The clothing will absorb reflections. Recording (your voice or other portable sound sources) under a table with blankets hanging over the sides is an excellent way to minimize unwanted reflections and block out other external sounds.
Listen to your recordings!Ideally you would “monitor” the recording in real time.
Listen as soon as possible so you can make adjustments and record again if needed.
Gather a diverse range of soundsRecord at least 20 unique sound sourcesYou are encouraged to make multiple recordings of the same sound source, but these only count as one sound source towards your requirement of 20 sounds.
Keep your recordings relatively brief (< 20 seconds).Some sounds might only last a fraction of a second, but record for a bit longer to capture any reverberations or echos.
If you make longer recordings, save a cropped version to upload.
Find a range of spectral qualitiesSpectral refers to the combination of frequencies that make up a sound. Most sounds have a mix of frequencies, but typically some frequency range dominates. We describe some sounds as "bassy" (lots of low frequency content), while others might be "tinny" (a thinner sound dominated by higher frequencies), or "glassy" (which can mean a lot of different things to different listeners). Just try to capture a range of sounds that have very different spectral qualities.
Find sounds with a range of temporal qualitiesSounds can be classified according to how they change over time.
Envelope: Attack, decay, sustain and release (Links to an external site.)
Envelopes are frequently applied to sounds for a variety of effects.Adobe Audition Help: Automating mixes with envelopes (Links to an external site.)
Record the ambient sounds of spaces (without specific subject or focal point)In film, these sounds are often referred to as "room tone" (whether inside or outside).
Record your voiceFor vocal recordings, it is especially important to minimize external sounds, minimize reflections (echos and reverberation), and have a good "signal to noise ratio". The easiest way to do this is to use the reflection minimizing techniques described above, place the microphone on a non-acoustically reflective surface so you don't make noise holding it, and keep the microphone close to your mouth.The more you practice speaking into a microphone, the more natural this will become. You might try telling a joke, describing where you are, or anything else you can think of to say, to help you relax and forget about the microphone, before you start trying to record a script or vocal performance.
Record sounds you generate yourself using "Foley" techniques.
Name all of your sound files with descriptive names (eg. chairFallingOnConcrete.aif)
Organize files recorded from common sound sources into folders to categorize them.For large collections, additional meta-data is often generated to classify sounds and make them searchable. (This is not necessary for this project.)
Produce a "zipped" archive file containing all of your recorded sounds. Name this file with your name (eg. laheyAudioRecordings.zip). You will submit this as part of the assignment deliverables.
Deliverables
Upload to this assignmentYour Zip file containing all your sound recordings.
Your written notes from your deep listening activity.
Upload to shared Google Drive Folder: MediaEditingF22OnlineSounds (Links to an external site.)Your original sound recording files (not the zip archive)Don't put files in folders (except in the case of multiple recordings of the same sound source).
Archive on your computer or personal storage spaceAny longer recordings that you cut down in duration to upload.
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