Categories
History

For each amendment:

In this reflection paper, please refine and expand your answers to our discussion questions. Be sure to develop your answers more fully than in the discussion. You can use additional material, ideas of other students, new thoughts. For this assignment, focus on just TWO amendments. You should have several paragraphs on each amendment, intro and conclusion.
For each Amendment:
The historical background: why are these things included? (Experience under the British, colonial beliefs about government, etc.)
How are the amendment’s elements relevant today? What are the modern-day challenges of applying them to current issues?

Categories
History

How are the amendment’s elements relevant today?

In this reflection paper, please refine and expand your answers to our discussion questions. Be sure to develop your answers more fully than in the discussion. You can use additional material, ideas of other students, new thoughts. For this assignment, focus on just TWO amendments. You should have several paragraphs on each amendment, intro and conclusion.
For each Amendment:
The historical background: why are these things included? (Experience under the British, colonial beliefs about government, etc.)
How are the amendment’s elements relevant today? What are the modern-day challenges of applying them to current issues?

Categories
History

The rebels’ organizational capacity and tenacity under pressure became the source of stories that shocked and frightened slave owners.

The said States hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other, for their common defense, the security of their liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other, against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade, or any other pretense whatever.”
– Articles of Confederation, Article III (1781)
In this upcoming section we will explore the circumstances that led to the creation of the United States Constitution and the governmental institutions we recognize to this day. Throughout the 1780s in the aftermath of George Washington’s victory at Yorktown, one question remained on the tongues of every inhabitant of the former thirteen colonies: what type of nation are we? The first constitution of the United States suggested that the American Revolution resulted in a “firm league of friendship” between thirteen separate states, with a loose central government – similar to today’s European Union. After a series of tax rebellions nearly ignited Civil War across the newly formed thirteen states, it soon became apparent that order and structure would be needed to keep the new republic intact.
In the aftermath two distinct approaches to government began to emerge with the ascension of George Washington to the Presidency of the United States. With the cautionary example of Cromwell, still fresh in the minds of our founders, the underlying threat of tyranny and dictatorship constantly looming over a system that entrusts power solely with the people. After completing two terms in office George Washington retired from politics, solidifying his reputation as one of the great heroes of Democracy and Republicanism, yet he also warned in his farewell address for future leaders not to descend into party politics.
Instead each sucessive President would have a major party affiliation, the first schism being the Federalists (Hamilton) and the Democratic-Republicans (Jefferson). Both had competing visions for where the destiny of America would lie, whether it be in trade and commerce or in agriculture and conquest. The very divisions that would eventually manifest in the Civil War can be seen in the debates between Hamilton and Jefferson. Today the Democrat and Republican divide looks quite different than the Federalist-Democratic-Republican divide, however several of the same underlying issues remain.
For all writing assignments you are required to do the following:
Write a 300-500 Word Review of your chosen media.
After completing your review you are expected to write TWO 100 Word responses to your classmates review, giving feedback, asking questions, and drawing connections between the subjects of your respective posts.
OPTION 1
Read: Davidson, Experience History Volume 1: Interpreting America’s Past (via McGraw Hill Connect)
Chapter 8: Crisis and Constitution
Chapter 9: The Early Republic
Chapter 10: The Opening of America
For your Chapter Reviews, you are expected to read the selected sections (manually edited by the instructor) that connect to our class lectures and discussions. Using the text as your source, write a 300-500 word short essay that answers any one of the following essential questions* from the Section 3 notes:
How did Shay’s Rebellion threaten the stability of the newly formed United States and bring the country to the brink of Civil War? What was the immediate outcome both for Shays and the country?
What were the most immediate challenges facing our Founding Fathers after the British officially withdrew from the Thirteen States? What were the limitations of the U.S. Government under the Articles of Confederation?
Detail the challenges and precedents set forth by the George Washington administration. What examples have future presidents and leaders aspired to follow and which warnings were entirely ignored?
Describe the differences between Jeffersonian and Hamiltonian Democracy. How did these competing ideals emerge into the Federalists and Democratic-Republicans? How are these differences reflected in today’s politics? What factors have consistently kept the United States as a two-party state since the 1790s?
How did foreign affairs, in particular the French Revolution and rise of Napoleon influence American politics during the 1790s and early 1800s. How did these concerns also inspire the outbreak of foreign interventions in North Africa with the Barbary Wars?
*When writing your essay in the discussion thread make sure to do the following:
If using a direct quote or block of information from the text, make sure to put the name of the textbook editor in parenthesis, followed by a period (Davidson).
Where possible, use examples from the text to support an historical argument that follows your own interpretation from the reading and ideas of its meaning. Do not simply say, “According to the book….” Instead make a statement and then use the book as a resource to help support your answers.
Discuss what you learned and what you would like to learn more about.
Where possible, connect at least one idea discussed in class to your review.
You are welcome – but not required – to challenge the historical perspective presented in the text. If there is something that you feel could be fleshed out more, or a part of the story that seems to be missing, be sure to point it out.
OPTION 2
Write a 300-500 word review on any of the following multimedia sources listed below. Your documentary/podcast review should contain the following:
A very brief summary (no more than 50 words ) that explains the premise of your chosen media source.
What did learn from and what you would like to learn more about?
List at least one blind spot or missed opportunity your source could have addressed.
Are there places where you believe your source could have given its audience or readers more information?
Identify at least one instance of bias (a preference toward one point of view over another) that occurred in your chosen resource.
There will always be occurrences of bias in everything you watch in this class. This is not necessarily a negative, but becoming aware of how a preferred point of view can inform the way a story is told is one of the primary goals of this course.
Where possible, connect at least one idea discussed in class to your review.
American Elections: Wicked Game: 1796/1800 Adams vs. Jefferson
1796, Adams vs. Jefferson: The First Contest Transcript
1800, Adams vs. Jefferson: Tiebreaker Transcript
In the 1796 election, two political forces of nature collide: Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. As the supporters of Adams and Jefferson vie for their candidate, the machinery of America’s nascent political parties is unleashed in the first contested election in American history. Four years later in 1800, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams part ways over the issue of France, history sets the stage for one of America’s oldest, and bloodiest political rivalries: Burr versus Hamilton. These two foes go to war in New York in one of the wildest elections in American history; an election that will ultimately be decided in the House of Representatives and that will end in bloodshed.
American History Tellers: Revolution – The Independent Woman/The Free Man/The Populist (Listen to all three)
In 1788, the hot gossip in posh British circles was all about France and America. For their friends across the channel, the popular uprising against King Louis XVI seems to be heading toward Revolution. And for their unruly cousins across the Atlantic, the fledgling country seems already headed for ruin. But this is a country their people believed in – and not just white men. A new generation of American women, inspired by the Enlightenment, were calling for greater freedoms.
Transcript for The Independent Woman 4
Transcript for The Free Man 5
Transcript for The Populist 6
Ben Franklin’s World: Abigail Adams
Transcript
Abigail Adams lived through and participated in the American Revolution. As the wife of John Adams, she used her position to famously remind Adams and his colleagues to “remember the ladies” when they created laws for the new, independent United States. In this episode, Woody Holton, a Professor of History at the University of South Carolina and author of Abigail Adams: A Life, helps us explore a different, largely unknown aspect of Adams’ life: Her financial investments.
https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/episode-150-woody-holton-abigail-adams-revolutionary-speculator/ (Links to an external site.)
Ben Franklin’s World: The Life and Ideas of Thomas Jefferson
Transcript
Thomas Jefferson wrote about liberty and freedom and yet owned over six hundred slaves during his lifetime.
He’s a founder who many of us have a hard time understanding.
This is why we need an expert to lead us through his life, so we can better understand who Jefferson was and how he came to his seemingly paradoxical ideas about slavery and freedom.
Annette-Gordon Reed, a professor of history and legal history at Harvard University and the winner of the National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize for her work on Thomas Jefferson and the Hemings Family, leads us on an exploration through the life and ideas of Thomas Jefferson.
https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/episode-117-annette-gordon-reed-the-life-and-ideas-of-thomas-jefferson/ (Links to an external site.)
Ben Franklin’s World: Madison’s Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention
Transcript
When politicians, lawyers, and historians discuss the Constitutional Convention of 1787, they often rely on two sources: The promotional tracts collectively known as The Federalist Papers and James Madison’s Notes of the Constitutional Convention. But what do we know about Madison’s Notes? Did Madison publish them to serve as a definitive account of the Constitutional Convention? Today, we explore James Madison’s Notes on the Constitutional Convention with award-winning legal historian Mary Sarah Bilder, the Founders Professor of Law at Boston College and author of Madison’s Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention.

Episode 107: Mary Sarah Bilder, Madison’s Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention


Constitution USA: Episode 1 – A More Perfect Union
Breathing new life into the traditional civics lesson, Peter Sagal travels across the country on a Harley Davidson to find out where the U.S. Constitution lives, how it works and how it doesn’t; how it unites us as a nation and how it has nearly torn us apart.
Ultimate Guide to the Presidents (1789-1825)
The United States of America was a bold invention of enormous risk. An 8-year war of independence, followed by intense political debate produced a government of, by and for the people.

The Making of the Constitution
Richly textured with historical art, compelling video footage, and insightful commentary, it explores a fascinating mix of individuals, political philosophers, and social issues of the day. Dramatized sections provide insights into what actually went on at Independence Hall while the document was being written.
The Soul of America (HBOMAX)
Based on Jon Meacham’s 2018 bestseller of the same name, The Soul of America follows the writer, journalist, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and presidential biographer as he offers his timely and invaluable insights into the country’s current political and historical moment by examining its past.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlwQ0Kutcq8
Hamilton: Building America
Captures the amazing life and times of our nation’s forgotten founding father: Alexander Hamilton. Exploring the iconic American political and financial institutions he helped to create, from the US Mint and Wall Street to the two-party political system, we’ll examine Hamilton’s enormous influence that still resonates today.

Terror! Robespierre and the French Revolution
In 1794, French revolutionary Maximilien Robespierre produced the world’s first defense of “state terror” – claiming that the road to virtue lay through political violence. This film combines drama, archive and documentary interviews to examine Robespierre’s year in charge of the Committee of Public Safety – the powerful state machine at the heart of Revolutionary France. Contesting Robespierre’s legacy are Slavoj Žižek, who argues that terror in the cause of virtue is justifiable, and Simon Schama, who believes the road from Robespierre ran straight to the gulag and the 20th-century concentration camp. The drama, based on original sources, follows the life-and-death politics of the Committee during “Year Two” of the new Republic. It was a year which gave birth to key features of the modern age: the thought crime; the belief that calculated acts of violence can perfect humanity; the notion that the interests of “mankind” can be placed above those of “man”; the use of policemen to enforce morals; and the use of denunciation as a political tool.
Egalite for All: Toussaint Louverture and The Haitian Revolution
The Haitian Revolution was a successful anti-slavery and anti-colonial insurrection that took place in the former French colony of Saint-Domingue that lasted from 1791 until 1804. It affected the institution of slavery throughout the Americas. Self-liberated slaves destroyed slavery at home, fought to preserve their freedom, and with the collaboration of mulattoes, founded the sovereign state of Haiti. It led to the greatest slave uprising since Spartacus’s unsuccessful revolt against the Roman Republic nearly 1,900 years prior. The Haitian Revolution was the only slave uprising that led to the founding of a state free from slavery and ruled by non-whites and former captives. With the increasing number of Haitian Revolutionary Studies in the last few decades, it has become clear that the event was a defining moment in the racial histories of the Atlantic World. The legacy of the Revolution was that it challenged long-held beliefs about black inferiority and of the enslaved person’s capacity to achieve and maintain freedom. The rebels’ organizational capacity and tenacity under pressure became the source of stories that shocked and frightened slave owners.
The Battle of Tripoli
Filled with period documents, original artwork and dramatic re-enactments, The Battle of Tripoli relives the historic engagement of 1805 when a ragtag army of 1,000 men won a dramatic victory against one of the world’s great powers. Led by diplomat turned general William Eaton, the force marched some 500 miles across the desert to free 307 American hostages held in Derna, Tripoli’s second largest city. Eaton hoped not only to free the hostages, but to end the practice of paying tribute to the Mediterranean kingdom to protect American merchant ships from pillage by the Barbary pirates.

Lewis and Clark: Crossing the Centuries
follows the Lewis & Clark route from St. Louis, Missouri to Oregon’s coast. The special looks at the changes 200 years have brought and visits some places on the route that are barely altered. Also examined are the effects of the trek on the Native Americans and their place in history and today’s world.

Categories
History

(experience under the british, colonial beliefs about government, etc.)

In this reflection paper, please refine and expand your answers to our discussion questions. Be sure to develop your answers more fully than in the discussion. You can use additional material, ideas of other students, new thoughts. For this assignment, focus on just TWO amendments. You should have several paragraphs on each amendment, intro and conclusion.
For each Amendment:
The historical background: why are these things included? (Experience under the British, colonial beliefs about government, etc.)
How are the amendment’s elements relevant today? What are the modern-day challenges of applying them to current issues?

Categories
History

What discussions or theories from the class/book could be applied to this situation?

To complete the assignment, you must go by yourself to a place you have not visited before, make observations of what is going on around you, and report your feelings about being different in that environment. Examples of being the minority include a White/Caucasian American attending a Black/African-American church, a heterosexual going to a LGBTQ+ event, or a non-disabled individual attending an event geared to disabled individuals. Be sure to stretch yourself by going to a place where you are in fact a “minority.” For example, a White/Caucasian American Protestant who goes to a Catholic Church service would not have as rich a minority experience as if the person went to a Black Methodist church. Ethnic minorities should also place themselves where they too are the “minority” such as a Hispanic person attending a Jewish synagogue or some other setting where they are different from others. Use your better judgment and make sure you do NOT visit a dangerous place or where your attendance would be disruptive.
In completing your paper, include the following elements:
The date and place where the experience took place
A brief description of the setting
Your reactions to the situation in terms of your thoughts and feelings
The reactions of others to you
What did the experience teach you about being different from others in an environment?
How did it feel to be the minority?
Were you identifiable? Did you have differential power from the majority?
What discussions or theories from the class/book could be applied to this situation?
What insights did the experience give you that you could apply to your current or past work situations?
‘A’ level papers are those that comprehensively address all the questions above and incorporate theories/research discussed in your textbook, outside readings, videos, content discussed in class, and contribute insights/observations beyond regurgitation of class materials.
Papers should be typed, double-spaced, in 12-in font, have 1” margins, and no longer than 5 pages in length.

Categories
History

Write a paragraph of minimum 100 words on the following topic.

Go over the reading material.
Write a paragraph of minimum 100 words on the following topic.
The theme of seasons is present during the Middle Ages in literature (The Wreath of San Gimignano by Folgóre) as well as in the figurative arts and illustrations (Tacuinum Sanitatis; The Limburgh Brothers). Discuss the function and importance of this theme. Do you see any connection to the present time?
Write two peer reviews after I received the post.

Categories
History

Constitutional law

B.1.3.1 Assigned Videos- Foundations of American Law
Common Law
Stuatatory Law
Constitutional Law
Equity Law
Discussion Question:
How does law in the United States integrate the four foundational legal elements?
Constitutional Law
Statutory Law
Common Law
Equity Law
Select one type of law and explain how it is applied in the United States

Categories
History

Transcript for the populist 6

Class Discussion 4 – “A Firm League of Friendship”
363363 unread replies.363363 replies.
“The said States hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other, for their common defense, the security of their liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other, against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade, or any other pretense whatever.”
– Articles of Confederation, Article III (1781)
In this upcoming section we will explore the circumstances that led to the creation of the United States Constitution and the governmental institutions we recognize to this day. Throughout the 1780s in the aftermath of George Washington’s victory at Yorktown, one question remained on the tongues of every inhabitant of the former thirteen colonies: what type of nation are we? The first constitution of the United States suggested that the American Revolution resulted in a “firm league of friendship” between thirteen separate states, with a loose central government – similar to today’s European Union. After a series of tax rebellions nearly ignited Civil War across the newly formed thirteen states, it soon became apparent that order and structure would be needed to keep the new republic intact.
In the aftermath two distinct approaches to government began to emerge with the ascension of George Washington to the Presidency of the United States. With the cautionary example of Cromwell, still fresh in the minds of our founders, the underlying threat of tyranny and dictatorship constantly looming over a system that entrusts power solely with the people. After completing two terms in office George Washington retired from politics, solidifying his reputation as one of the great heroes of Democracy and Republicanism, yet he also warned in his farewell address for future leaders not to descend into party politics.
Instead each sucessive President would have a major party affiliation, the first schism being the Federalists (Hamilton) and the Democratic-Republicans (Jefferson). Both had competing visions for where the destiny of America would lie, whether it be in trade and commerce or in agriculture and conquest. The very divisions that would eventually manifest in the Civil War can be seen in the debates between Hamilton and Jefferson. Today the Democrat and Republican divide looks quite different than the Federalist-Democratic-Republican divide, however several of the same underlying issues remain.
For all writing assignments you are required to do the following:
Write a 300-500 Word Review of your chosen media.
After completing your review you are expected to write TWO 100 Word responses to your classmates review, giving feedback, asking questions, and drawing connections between the subjects of your respective posts.
OPTION 1
Read: Davidson, Experience History Volume 1: Interpreting America’s Past (via McGraw Hill Connect)
Chapter 8: Crisis and Constitution
Chapter 9: The Early Republic
Chapter 10: The Opening of America
For your Chapter Reviews, you are expected to read the selected sections (manually edited by the instructor) that connect to our class lectures and discussions. Using the text as your source, write a 300-500 word short essay that answers any one of the following essential questions* from the Section 3 notes:
How did Shay’s Rebellion threaten the stability of the newly formed United States and bring the country to the brink of Civil War? What was the immediate outcome both for Shays and the country?
What were the most immediate challenges facing our Founding Fathers after the British officially withdrew from the Thirteen States? What were the limitations of the U.S. Government under the Articles of Confederation?
Detail the challenges and precedents set forth by the George Washington administration. What examples have future presidents and leaders aspired to follow and which warnings were entirely ignored?
Describe the differences between Jeffersonian and Hamiltonian Democracy. How did these competing ideals emerge into the Federalists and Democratic-Republicans? How are these differences reflected in today’s politics? What factors have consistently kept the United States as a two-party state since the 1790s?
How did foreign affairs, in particular the French Revolution and rise of Napoleon influence American politics during the 1790s and early 1800s. How did these concerns also inspire the outbreak of foreign interventions in North Africa with the Barbary Wars?
*When writing your essay in the discussion thread make sure to do the following:
If using a direct quote or block of information from the text, make sure to put the name of the textbook editor in parenthesis, followed by a period (Davidson).
Where possible, use examples from the text to support an historical argument that follows your own interpretation from the reading and ideas of its meaning. Do not simply say, “According to the book….” Instead make a statement and then use the book as a resource to help support your answers.
Discuss what you learned and what you would like to learn more about.
Where possible, connect at least one idea discussed in class to your review.
You are welcome – but not required – to challenge the historical perspective presented in the text. If there is something that you feel could be fleshed out more, or a part of the story that seems to be missing, be sure to point it out.
OPTION 2
Write a 300-500 word review on any of the following multimedia sources listed below. Your documentary/podcast review should contain the following:
A very brief summary (no more than 50 words ) that explains the premise of your chosen media source.
What did learn from and what you would like to learn more about?
List at least one blind spot or missed opportunity your source could have addressed.
Are there places where you believe your source could have given its audience or readers more information?
Identify at least one instance of bias (a preference toward one point of view over another) that occurred in your chosen resource.
There will always be occurrences of bias in everything you watch in this class. This is not necessarily a negative, but becoming aware of how a preferred point of view can inform the way a story is told is one of the primary goals of this course.
Where possible, connect at least one idea discussed in class to your review.
American Elections: Wicked Game: 1796/1800 Adams vs. Jefferson
1796, Adams vs. Jefferson: The First Contest Transcript
1800, Adams vs. Jefferson: Tiebreaker Transcript
In the 1796 election, two political forces of nature collide: Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. As the supporters of Adams and Jefferson vie for their candidate, the machinery of America’s nascent political parties is unleashed in the first contested election in American history. Four years later in 1800, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams part ways over the issue of France, history sets the stage for one of America’s oldest, and bloodiest political rivalries: Burr versus Hamilton. These two foes go to war in New York in one of the wildest elections in American history; an election that will ultimately be decided in the House of Representatives and that will end in bloodshed.

American History Tellers: Revolution – The Independent Woman/The Free Man/The Populist (Listen to all three)
In 1788, the hot gossip in posh British circles was all about France and America. For their friends across the channel, the popular uprising against King Louis XVI seems to be heading toward Revolution. And for their unruly cousins across the Atlantic, the fledgling country seems already headed for ruin. But this is a country their people believed in – and not just white men. A new generation of American women, inspired by the Enlightenment, were calling for greater freedoms.
Transcript for The Independent Woman 4
Transcript for The Free Man 5
Transcript for The Populist 6

Ben Franklin’s World: Abigail Adams
Transcript
Abigail Adams lived through and participated in the American Revolution. As the wife of John Adams, she used her position to famously remind Adams and his colleagues to “remember the ladies” when they created laws for the new, independent United States. In this episode, Woody Holton, a Professor of History at the University of South Carolina and author of Abigail Adams: A Life, helps us explore a different, largely unknown aspect of Adams’ life: Her financial investments.
https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/episode-150-woody-holton-abigail-adams-revolutionary-speculator/ (Links to an external site.)
Ben Franklin’s World: The Life and Ideas of Thomas Jefferson
Transcript
Thomas Jefferson wrote about liberty and freedom and yet owned over six hundred slaves during his lifetime.
He’s a founder who many of us have a hard time understanding.
This is why we need an expert to lead us through his life, so we can better understand who Jefferson was and how he came to his seemingly paradoxical ideas about slavery and freedom.
Annette-Gordon Reed, a professor of history and legal history at Harvard University and the winner of the National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize for her work on Thomas Jefferson and the Hemings Family, leads us on an exploration through the life and ideas of Thomas Jefferson.
https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/episode-117-annette-gordon-reed-the-life-and-ideas-of-thomas-jefferson/ (Links to an external site.)
Ben Franklin’s World: Madison’s Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention
Transcript
When politicians, lawyers, and historians discuss the Constitutional Convention of 1787, they often rely on two sources: The promotional tracts collectively known as The Federalist Papers and James Madison’s Notes of the Constitutional Convention. But what do we know about Madison’s Notes? Did Madison publish them to serve as a definitive account of the Constitutional Convention? Today, we explore James Madison’s Notes on the Constitutional Convention with award-winning legal historian Mary Sarah Bilder, the Founders Professor of Law at Boston College and author of Madison’s Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention.
https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/episode-107-mary-sarah-bilder-madisons-hand-revising-constitutional-convention/ (Links to an external site.)
Constitution USA: Episode 1 – A More Perfect Union
Breathing new life into the traditional civics lesson, Peter Sagal travels across the country on a Harley Davidson to find out where the U.S. Constitution lives, how it works and how it doesn’t; how it unites us as a nation and how it has nearly torn us apart.
Ultimate Guide to the Presidents (1789-1825)
The United States of America was a bold invention of enormous risk. An 8-year war of independence, followed by intense political debate produced a government of, by and for the people.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jbx2OsU3p_A (Links to an external site.)
The Making of the Constitution
Richly textured with historical art, compelling video footage, and insightful commentary, it explores a fascinating mix of individuals, political philosophers, and social issues of the day. Dramatized sections provide insights into what actually went on at Independence Hall while the document was being written.
The Soul of America (HBOMAX)
Based on Jon Meacham’s 2018 bestseller of the same name, The Soul of America follows the writer, journalist, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and presidential biographer as he offers his timely and invaluable insights into the country’s current political and historical moment by examining its past.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlwQ0Kutcq8 (Links to an external site.)
Hamilton: Building America
Captures the amazing life and times of our nation’s forgotten founding father: Alexander Hamilton. Exploring the iconic American political and financial institutions he helped to create, from the US Mint and Wall Street to the two-party political system, we’ll examine Hamilton’s enormous influence that still resonates today.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsvP4WRIUB4 (Links to an external site.)
Terror! Robespierre and the French Revolution
In 1794, French revolutionary Maximilien Robespierre produced the world’s first defense of “state terror” – claiming that the road to virtue lay through political violence. This film combines drama, archive and documentary interviews to examine Robespierre’s year in charge of the Committee of Public Safety – the powerful state machine at the heart of Revolutionary France. Contesting Robespierre’s legacy are Slavoj Žižek, who argues that terror in the cause of virtue is justifiable, and Simon Schama, who believes the road from Robespierre ran straight to the gulag and the 20th-century concentration camp. The drama, based on original sources, follows the life-and-death politics of the Committee during “Year Two” of the new Republic. It was a year which gave birth to key features of the modern age: the thought crime; the belief that calculated acts of violence can perfect humanity; the notion that the interests of “mankind” can be placed above those of “man”; the use of policemen to enforce morals; and the use of denunciation as a political tool.
Egalite for All: Toussaint Louverture and The Haitian Revolution
The Haitian Revolution was a successful anti-slavery and anti-colonial insurrection that took place in the former French colony of Saint-Domingue that lasted from 1791 until 1804. It affected the institution of slavery throughout the Americas. Self-liberated slaves destroyed slavery at home, fought to preserve their freedom, and with the collaboration of mulattoes, founded the sovereign state of Haiti. It led to the greatest slave uprising since Spartacus’s unsuccessful revolt against the Roman Republic nearly 1,900 years prior. The Haitian Revolution was the only slave uprising that led to the founding of a state free from slavery and ruled by non-whites and former captives. With the increasing number of Haitian Revolutionary Studies in the last few decades, it has become clear that the event was a defining moment in the racial histories of the Atlantic World. The legacy of the Revolution was that it challenged long-held beliefs about black inferiority and of the enslaved person’s capacity to achieve and maintain freedom. The rebels’ organizational capacity and tenacity under pressure became the source of stories that shocked and frightened slave owners.
The Battle of Tripoli
Filled with period documents, original artwork and dramatic re-enactments, The Battle of Tripoli relives the historic engagement of 1805 when a ragtag army of 1,000 men won a dramatic victory against one of the world’s great powers. Led by diplomat turned general William Eaton, the force marched some 500 miles across the desert to free 307 American hostages held in Derna, Tripoli’s second largest city. Eaton hoped not only to free the hostages, but to end the practice of paying tribute to the Mediterranean kingdom to protect American merchant ships from pillage by the Barbary pirates.
https://youtu.be/MYDyER2tD94 (Links to an external site.)
Lewis and Clark: Crossing the Centuries
follows the Lewis & Clark route from St. Louis, Missouri to Oregon’s coast. The special looks at the changes 200 years have brought and visits some places on the route that are barely altered. Also examined are the effects of the trek on the Native Americans and their place in history and today’s world.

Categories
History

You must use both your primary and secondary sources as evidence to help prove your argument.

Download the blank, pre-formatted document in MS Word ONLY and answer the
following (for #s 1-3, you can use a numbered list, please write #4 as an essay, no #)
1. Identify your inflection point.
a. This can be a person, event, movement, law…
2. Identify one primary and one secondary source about your inflection point
a. These sources cannot be provided in the textbook, on Blackboard, or
discussed in lecture.
b. YOU must seek them out
c. In 1-2 sentences for each source, explain how it fits the point you are
talking about.
3. As part of our examination of change over time, draw a line from your event in
the past to some echo today.
a. This doesn’t have to be a perfectly straight line, but there does need to be a
relationship
4. In an argumentative essay of 300-500 words explain why the point you chose
was so significant.
a. You must use both your primary and secondary sources as evidence to
help prove your argument.
b. You should also use information from lectures, Blackboard, and the
textbook, all cited appropriately with footnotes.
Your essay should be flawlessly typed and written in a
clear, orderly fashion. You should have an introductory paragraph, the last part of
which should contain a clear thesis statement that describes your argument. The thesis
should serve as a “map” for the rest of your essay. In other words, the bulk of your essay
should support your thesis with specific information. Your essay should be typed, using
the document provided; DO NOT include a title page.
In short, citations are REQUIRED. You must cite using Chicago-style footnotes.
Parenthetical or other style guides (i.e., MLA or APA) are not appropriate. Check the
link to Purdue OWL’s guide to Chicago citations in the instructions folder, but please
DO NOT use the citation generator on the website (It is not foolproof and there are
issues with any automatic citation generator). Follow the guide for “Notes and
Bibliography (NB)” NOT Author-Date.
Your essay should be no shorter than 300 words but no longer than 500 words.
Neither footnotes nor quotations count towards word total. The best papers are the ones
that have a clear thesis statement and then support that thesis with as much specific
information from the lectures and readings as possible. Please remember, however, that
you are not just recapping what the other authors have written, but making an
argument of your own, based on the arguments that they have made.
i believe that we should use the revolutionary war as our inflection point.

Categories
History

Do not upload .pages or google docs.

Learning Goal: I’m working on a history writing question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
Required Sources:
● Hernan Cortes,“The Spaniards Describe Indigenous Religion” from theFirst
Letter to King Charles V of Spain
(1519)
● Hernan Cortes,“Cortes Describes Tenochtitlan” from theSecond Letter to King
Charles V of Spain
(1520)
Prompt: How did Cortes describe the Mexica’s religion, economy, and capital (Tenochtitlan)?
Directions:
Use the lecture, readings, and videos to help you understand the historical context of the primary
sources, but base your prompt answer/argument and the bulk of your paper on information found
in the required primary sources.
The primary sources MUST be cited in your paper so I know where the information that you are
discussing came from. This is true for all papers; you must explain where you are getting your
information from. Use in-text MLA-style citations(author’s last name page number) at the end of
the sentence it relates to.
Consider the following questions when you are writing your essay. Who wrote the primary source
and how did their social location (race, class, gender, sexuality, etc.) influence their writing and the
argument they made in the primary source. There is always an argument of some kind in primary
sources; some are more obvious than others.
Papers must be 2 pages in length and should follow standard formatting (typed, double-spaced, 12
pt. Times New Roman font, 1 inch margins).
Your paper must have:
  • An argument (prompt answer), which you underline and state at the beginning of your paper.
  • At least 3 cited examples from the primary sources to support or prove yourargument.
  • An introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion.
DO NOT use outside research and do not plagiarize. Plagiarism will be reported to Student Affairs
as per the syllabus.
Your paper must be uploaded to Canvas by the due date. It should be uploaded as a .doc, .docx, or
.pdf. Do not upload .pages or google docs. You can convert pages and google docs to a .doc or .pdf
format. If I cannot read your work it will not be accepted.
Use the checklist to verify that you completed all aspects of the assignment.
Checklist:
□ 2 pages in length, used standard formatting
□ Essay format: introduction, body paragraphs, conclusion
□ Clearly written, proofread, and spell-checked
□ Specifically answered all parts of the prompt
□ Underlined argument and supported it well with at least 3 pieces of evidence
□ Used all required sources and cited them correctly
□ Did not use outside research and did not plagiarize