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Learning Goal: I’m working on a social science question and need an explanation

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Learning Goal: I’m working on a social science question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
Submit your completed sociological write-up of your dissimilar neighborhoods study before the end of this module. If you set out to earnestly and comprehensively answer all of the sociological guiding questions in the provided outline you will end up with a substantial paper. Most of your content should be based on field site observations, some significant background research, and class content covered during the semester (particularly the second half). Incorporating and explaining 10 key terms (plus a few associated sociological thinkers) into your writing will likewise add substantive material to your written project. Be sure all researched material is summarized and blended into your findings, and that in-text citations are included even for paraphrased information. The essay should be in the format of a simple magazine layout that is illustrated with photos you took during your observations.
Cities are never locations of singular socioeconomic people and activities; they are immensely diverse and are made of numerous districts and neighborhoods, and each has distinguishing characteristics that makes it exceptional. These attributes and peculiarities—the types of people who live in the area, the economy or primary purpose of the district, the physical design, the upkeep, etc.—are all symbols that require anyone within them (including the researcher) to interpret and respond to while interacting with the social and physical environment. Human conduct diverges from place to place, depending on a multitude of determinants like cultural upbringing, socioeconomic class, level of education and lifestyle. These factors also result in each individual having a unique mentally constructed view of the world, affecting the way they interpret the social and physical symbols encountered during day to day life.
City Street
Just about every city neighborhood (or downtown area in smaller towns) contains physical evidence of its past, such as old buildings, historical monuments or even graveyards, and these artifacts offer a glimpse of what the place once was in another era. Since cities— their function and the people who live within them—constantly evolve, these timeworn relics, in some way, link the past to the present. Your investigation into two disparate neighborhoods and the people within them is a sociological and historical undertaking to observe and compare the differences of each. The focus of this study is primarily based upon symbols—the attributes of people and the physical environment—and how those symbols affect social interaction. The structure of this exercise is based upon answering the set of sociological guiding questions that were provided to you in the form of an outline.
Following the Outline and Addressing the Sociological Guiding Questions
After gathering an adequate amount of information from your fieldwork observations and background research, you will organize your findings by placing them under the particular sociological guiding questions they best match. These questions are located in the pertinent sections of the supplied outline.
Your paper needs to be clearly structured around the five sections, and each section heading should be presented in bold typeface for organizational purposes. For example, the first page of your essay should have “Introduction” in bold font, and the second section should begin with “Research” in bold font, and so on. All of the guiding questions within each of the five sections need to be answered with as much detail and elaboration as possible.
Here is the outline with the sociological guiding questions:
Introduction: Which two distinctive neighborhoods are you going to analyze for this project, and why did you select them (what are you hoping to learn more about)? What research methods will be used for this investigation?
Research: What is the general history of these two neighborhoods and what are their primary functions today? What are the broad demographics of these neighborhoods and how have they altered over the years? What are one or two noticeable historical artifacts in each locality, connecting the past to the present, that reveal change and/or continuity over time?
Fieldwork: What recognizable symbols (both human and environmental) define these two areas, and how might they influence the way people interact with each other and their surroundings? What are some perceived background factors among local inhabitants and visitors (such as culture, income level , age, education, etc.) in each district, and how might they affect social interactions?
Analysis: What are three sociological theories covered during the second half of the semester that can be applied to your neighborhood investigations? Explain each theory as it pertains to your fieldwork observations and background research findings. (A bank of class terms and theories has been provided in Module 13.)
Conclusion: After completing fieldwork observations, background research, and analysis, what is a brief summary of your overall discoveries (what significant information did you learn)?
KEY TERMS
For your Final Project, you will need to incorporate at least 10 key terms in a logical manner throughout your paper. Here are associated criteria:
Terms need to be in bold font so they stand out from the rest of the text. Only the 10 key terms and the section titles of your outline (i.e., Introduction, Research, Analysis, etc.) should be in bold font.
The terms should be perfectly clear and understandable to the reader. It is essential that they be used in the proper context and that you elaborate on their meaning. Imagine that the reader has no idea what these terms mean, so explain them well.
At least two of the 10 terms need to be associated with a particular sociological/urban thinker(s), and their significance should be included while you describe the term’s connotation. Thinkers connected to particular terms are provided in parentheses, along with the module where information can be found.
Do not copy definitions from the modules or any other sources. The idea here is to paraphrase definitions in original wording to reveal genuine comprehension. How would you explain these terms to someone who was unfamiliar with them?
The 10 terms must be from the following provided list.
mental construct (Module 9)environmental cognition (Moore; Module 9)imageability (Lynch; Module 9)
use significance (Gary Moore; Module 9)looking-glass self (Cooley; Module 9)sympathetic introspection (Module 9)
dramaturgical perspective (Goffman)(Module 9)social enforcement (Module 9)labeling (Lofland; Module 9)
symbolic interactionism (Mead, Blumer; Module 9)sector theory (Hoyt) (Module 10)social control (Modules 10 and 11)
situational determinism (Goffman; Module 10)deviance (formal/informal) (Module 11)environmental psychology (Gallagher; Module 11)
broken windows theory (Wilson and Kelling; Module 11)walking size (Module 12)mixed-use development (Module 12)
sprawl (Module 12)urban renewal (Modules 12 and 13)revitalization (Module 13)
gentrification (Module 13)new urbanism (Module 13)norms (Module 14)
At least three sources should be utilized for your Final Project historical research, and these sources need to be more than generic neighborhood tourism websites or online encyclopedias like Wikipedia. You are encouraged to use the Academy of Art University Library online academic search databases, and/or other reputable search engines such as Google Scholar, Microsoft Academic, or iSeek. The best sources of information, however, are physical books that generally provide greater context for the subject matter you are learning about. Finding printed titles relevant to your topic is as easy as browsing the databases of your local or Academy (if you are in San Francisco) library. No matter how you obtain your research information, please remember to provide important in-text citations within the body of your work where you incorporate researched data. These in-text citations should align with the full bibliographical information listed in your Works Cited page at the end of your paper, and both should be formatted according to MLA guidelines.
Never copy and paste material from an online source into your paper. Inserting the work of other authors and changing a few words around is not only lazy writing, it is also dishonest and considered plagiarism. All information that you use from digital or printed sources need to be paraphrased or summarized entirely in your own words and then this data should be synthesized with your other findings to address the appropriate guiding questions. In-text citations are still necessary when you paraphrase material. Lastly, unless there is a particular sentence or two that you feel is perfectly articulated by the original author, you are encouraged to not integrate any direct quotes from your sources at all. If you do, please be sure to put these words in quotations (and of course, included an in-text citation).

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